Bruce Royan – Bursary donor

 

Why did you decide to give to UCT? When my mother passed, as she was a UCT alumnus and a strong supporter of women’s education, I felt that the family should create a permanent, and hopefully valuable way to commemorate her life

How does giving to UCT make you feel? And why does it matter to you? I like to feel in some small way that I am improving the chances of some talented young people to be the best that they can be. In the grand scheme of things it is a very limited intervention, however I hope for them individually it has made a material difference. I like to think that my mother would think it was a good thing to do. I know my Father who survived her thought so

Which project/s at UCT do you feel drawn to donate to? And why? As per the above, the scholarship is a named scholarship for my mother, related to supporting female students with decent grades but disadvantaged circumstances primarily in the health care sciences and services.

 

Anonymous – Graduate of 2012 – Bursaries & Schools Improvement Initiative donor

 

Why did you decide to give to UCT? I was a student at UCT from 2008 to 2012 (Bachelor of Business Science, and then PGDA). I choose to give to UCT as a way to further education in Africa and I would like to direct money towards UCT because UCT has a great need for this funding.

Which project/s at UCT do you feel drawn to donate to? And why? Scholarship programs, which enable those without the necessary privilege to pursue an education and the maintenance of libraries and facilities, which enable student learning, are typical areas I am drawn to donate to.

What motivates you to keep giving back to UCT? A stable financial situation. If that changed I would probably not continue, but as long as that does, I am happy to continue contributing to the place which had a profound impact on my own education.

 

Dr Sonny Salasa – Schools Improvement Initiative donor

 

When were you a student at UCT and what was your field of study? I graduated in Medicine from what was then-known as the “UCT Medical School” in December 1967, within weeks of the first heart transplant being performed at Groote Schuur Hospital. It not only filled one with a sense of pride, but also a feeling of humility to be graduating from an institution of such a high calibre.

Why do you choose to give back to UCT? Throughout my professional life I have felt that I needed to pay homage to the high standard of education I had received at UCT, not only through the medical curriculum, but also by the inculcation of rational thought and analysis in the medical field. Inevitably this spills over into other spheres of life, and is what a true university education is about.

It was inspiring to be taught by people such as Professor Brock, and above all my tutor in the final year Bill Hoffenberg, who was an inspiration not only in the tutorials, but also socially. Struggling under the banning orders of the racist regime, he and his wife Margaret, still managed to meet his tutorial group socially, through loopholes in the banning orders.

What motivates you to keep giving back to UCT? In supporting UCT I wish the institution to continue not only the noble tradition of academic excellence, but also to set students on to that road of intellectual self discovery, that comes from the experience of a university education, and it is for this reason that I have continued to support the university over the years.